Caught with Valium tablets

Have you been charged for possession of controlled drugs for sale or supply? Calls us Now on 018724717 or 0868257176 to represent you. Under the legislation, it is an offence to be in possession of a controlled drug with the intention of selling it illegally. Anyone found guilty of this offence is liable to a class C fine on summary conviction in a District Court. If the court decides, he or she could be subject to a fine and a prison term not exceeding 12 months. On conviction on indictment for this offence, the court can decide on an appropriate fine. The court can also impose a life sentence for this offence if it decides it is necessary. However, lesser sentences can also be imposed, either with a fine or alone. Where the market value of the drugs is €13,000 or more, the person convicted is liable for a minimum sentence of 10 years. This does not apply, however, where the court is satisfied there are exceptional circumstances. Similar penalties apply to someone convicted of importing drugs with a value of €13,000 or more. Anyone found guilty of supplying or attempting to supply a controlled drug into a prison, children detention school or remand centre can receive a class B fine on summary conviction or a prison term not exceeding 12 months or both. On conviction on indictment, the court can impose an appropriate fine or a maximum prison term of 10 years or both. Under the Criminal Justice (Psychoactive Substances) Act 2010 it is an offence to sell or supply for human consumption substances which are not specifically proscribed under the Misuse of Drugs Acts, but which have psychoactive effects. Anyone found guilty of such an offence is liable for a class A fine on summary conviction or imprisoned for a term not exceeding 12 months or both. On conviction on indictment they can be fined or imprisoned for a term not exceeding 5 years or both.

Call us today on 018724717 or 0868257176

Unlawful arrest and detention

Have you been unlawfully arrested? Call us today on 018724717 or 0868257176 to represent you. If you have been unlawfully arrested, evidence obtained as a result of that arrest will be inadmissible. For example, if you were mistakenly told by a Garda that you were being arrested under the wrong section of the Road Traffic Act, the arrest and the blood sample taken would be unlawful. The blood sample would not be admissible as evidence. Evidence obtained while you are unlawfully detained has also been unlawfully obtained and will be inadmissible. For example, if you have been in custody for longer than the maximum period allowed and you make a confession, that confession will not be admissible in evidence against you. Evidence obtained in breach of your right to reasonable access to a lawyer is also inadmissible as evidence against you. For example, if you request a lawyer and your request is refused, any statements you make to the police will be inadmissible as evidence against you.

Call us today on 018724717 or 0868257176

Personal injuries assessment

InjuriesBoard.ie, formerly known as the Personal Injuries Assessment Board (PIAB), is an independent statutory body set up under the Personal Injuries Assessment Board Act 2003. All personal injury claims in Ireland (except for cases involving medical negligence) must be submitted to InjuriesBoard.ie. The Board provides an independent assessment of personal injury claims for compensation following road traffic, workplace or public liability accidents. Where the person responsible (the respondent) does not consent to InjuriesBoard.ie assessing your claim for compensation, InjuriesBoard.ie will allow you to pursue your claim through the courts. Claims are assessed on average within 7 months of the respondent consenting. Personal injury claims through litigation (that is, the courts) can take up to 36 months (3 years). Claims are assessed using the medical evidence you provide from your doctor and, if necessary, a report provided by an independent doctor appointed by InjuriesBoard.ie. The assessment of the damages due is made having regard to the particular injuries you sustained and your circumstances. Guideline amounts for compensation in respect of particular injuries are set out in the Book of Quantum  which was prepared for the Board in 2004. An online version known as the Estimator  are available on the Board's website. If the respondent does not agree to an assessment by InjuriesBoard.ie or if either side rejects the Board’s award, the matter can then be referred to the courts. From 1 August 2014, under the Recovery of Certain Benefits and Assistance Scheme the Department of Social Protection can recover the value of certain illness-related social welfare payments from compensation awards. The benefits are recovered from the compensator and not from the injured person. How to apply? To make a personal injury claim for compensation you can: The following documentation is required for you to complete your application:
  • A completed Application Form (Form A) (pdf) which can be submitted online or by post.
  • A Medical Assessment Form (Form B) (pdf) completed by your treating doctor. This can be submitted by you online or by post.
  • Payment of €45. This can be paid by telephone using a credit or debit card. They can also be used online if you are submitting your application online. Alternatively, you can send a cheque or postal order, payable to InjuriesBoard.ie, by post.
You should also provide receipts for any financial loss that you have incurred as a result of the accident, together with any other documentation you may consider relevant to your claim. If making an application on behalf of child (someone under age 18) or on behalf of someone who has been fatally injured, you must make the application by post. Also, you must use a Fatal Accident Application Form (Form A) (pdf) when claiming for someone fatally injured.

Equality Tribunal Award

Case Study James Watters & Co Solicitors recently secured a substantial Equality Tribunal award for a client in the an employment law and equality law matter. Our client worked in retail. In or about May 2010 it was alleged that a customer was racially abusive towards her. Our client was so upset by the abuse she reported it to the Gardaí. The Gardaí contacted the person who had allegedly abused our client but she denied it. Our client told the Gardaí she did not wish to pursue the matter further. The following morning our client was then called into a meeting by her employer (the ‘Respondent’); he seemed annoyed that the matter had been reported to the Gardaí. Following the meeting she was informed that she was being transferred to another location. Our client explained that this was not convenient for her as she had a small child; however she was told that this was not her employer’s concern and her presence in the shop was affecting business. On the first day in the new location she was told by her manager that a customer had complained about her and that she would be put to do more menial work. Our client decided to leave the job and managed to get alternative employment elsewhere. After two weeks in the new job her new employer asked her if she had been working in the respondents business. She told him that she had. The next day she received a text from her new employer to say there were no hours for her and he would let her go. Our client engaged James Watters & Co Solicitors to help her resolve her employment law and equality law issues. The Equality Officer made a finding against the old employer. The Equality Tribunal found that our client had been discriminated against on the basis of her race, colour, nationality or ethnic or national origins. It was also found that she was the victim of harassment and her treatment following her making the complaint amounted to victimisation. As a result of making these findings the Equality Officer made the following award: • €14,000 in compensation for the distress caused by the discrimination and constructive dismissal; • €20,000 in compensation for the distress caused by victimisation. The full decision is available at: http://www.equalitytribunal.ie/en/Cases/2013/December/DEC-E2013-193.html If you have any employment law or equality law issues call Watters Solicitors at 01-872 4717